Traditional skills bring valued heirlooms back to life

Just a short post this evening. It’s 7.40pm and the next instalment of BBC1’s The Repair Shop is on at 8. If you haven’t seen the programme and you can access the BBC’s iPlayer service, then I highly recommend it. Essentially, the programme brings together a range of craftspeople who work on repairing and reviving treasured family possessions and heirlooms that have been damaged or neglected. The skill of the craftspeople is brilliant to witness in its own right, but what really makes The Repair Shop must-watch TV in our house are the powerful emotions that are released in the people whose treasures have been lovingly restored.

Whilst sometimes the items are valuable in their own right, often they have little monetary value but a lifetime of cherished memories. The emotional response to seeing the memories prompted by the revelation of a cleaned up, restored or repaired item is incredibly moving. It’s quite usual for the person whose brought the item, the craftspeople who worked on it, and at least two members of the TV audience at home (me and Mrs P.) to end up in floods of (joyful) tears in the course of the 60 minute programme. I’ve got to go know – I need to make sure I have a clean handkerchief close at hand ready for the start!

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